Read All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten Uncommon Thoughts on Common Things by Robert Fulghum Online

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This book is about what you learn about life and getting along. Having hope that what you dream about and would like to have is around the corner. This book tells the story through the eyes of children. I read she is a very good writer and the book ought to make you laugh. Enjoy the book....

Title : All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten Uncommon Thoughts on Common Things
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780804105262
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 196 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten Uncommon Thoughts on Common Things Reviews

  • Roy
    2019-03-19 05:48

    When I read this book years ago, my first thought was that it would make an excellent Christmas gift for anyone who I couldn't figure out what else to get. The simple philosophy of living that it promotes and the author's easy going style of prose would elicit a smile from a stone. I can't quite say that it changed my life, but I was certainly charmed by this book. It also taught me a lesson in the money making potential of publishing because I happened to work for Ballantine at the time and was constantly issuing purchase orders for reprints of huge quantities of this little paperback. I recall that it only cost about a quarter per book to produce and we were charging $6 or $7 for it, quite a nice profit for the little goldmine that could. The author visited our office one day and acted exactly the way you would have expected him to, like the wise, charming grandpa you never actually had.

  • Raymond
    2019-03-08 02:52

    I am not sure this book is important to me. But I will tell you this - one of the most delightful things I had read in a long time, and a thing I have tried to memorize, is Fulghum's wonderful list:"Share everything.Play fair.Don't hit people.Put things back where you found them.Clean up your own mess.Don't take things that aren't yours.Say you're sorry when you hurt somebody.Wash your hands before you eat.Flush.Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.Live a balanced life - learn some and think someand draw and paint and sing and dance and playand work every day some.Take a nap every afternoon.When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic,hold hands, and stick together.Be aware of wonder.Remember the little seed in the styrofoam cup:The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobodyreally knows how or why, but we are all like that.Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and eventhe little seed in the Styrofoam cup - they all die.So do we.And then remember the Dick-and-Jane booksand the first word you learned - the biggestword of all - LOOK…"

  • Maegan
    2019-02-25 05:00

    Essentially the GREATEST book I've ever read. I loved the humor, but it also expressed hidden truths that integrate themselves into our day to day lives in a quirky sort of way. I thoroughly enjoyed the insight that you received through out the entirety of the book. Made me think about things...lots of things. Mr. Fulghum reminds me a lot of, well, ME. I thought it was stunning.

  • Laura
    2019-02-26 21:46

    The only people who learned all they needed to know in kindergarten are the people who died when they were six. This stupid book is as facile as its title.

  • Vít Kotačka
    2019-03-16 01:47

    Tuhle knížku jsem četl ve cca dvaceti a bylo to jako zjevení. Četli ji i moji nejbližší přátelé a všichni jsme z ní byli nadšení. Mladický optimismus a dychtivost. Svět nebyl jednoduché místo k životu, ale byl krásný.Po dalších dvaceti letech už se na spoustu věcí dívám jinak, ale dodnes (a asi i do konce života) si budu pamatovat dvě věci:* Historku o indiánovi, co tancoval se židlí: A indián řekl: "Tak na co čekáte? Budeme tancovat."* A pak, asi nejsilnější knižní moto vůbec: A věřím, že láska je silnější než smrt.

  • Marie
    2019-03-11 01:58

    I find it funny that so many people who reviewed this book made comments about the title. Why on earth does the title really matter? I know I have read hundreds of books with odd titles, but I did not base my review on it.This book was easy to read - I read it in one rainy afternoon. I did not pick this book up to find the answers of life - I read it because it seemed light and fun - which it was.I feel the book is very cool - hundreds of times I have thought random, misc. thoughts and told myself, I should write that down, but of course never do.Fun, coffee table type book that I will keep around and read again someday!

  • Jinky
    2019-03-13 03:54

    I've found reading adult non-fiction books to be a tedious read because it involves many facts. I finally gave up on one that I've had for almost a month because telling me every detail history of her relatives just got too much and it looked like she wasn't going to let up! But this book had nothing tedious about it. It had me chuckling through the entire book. It was sooooo easy to turn from one page to the next and time just flew by. I would have been disappointed that it ended but Mr. Fulghum ended it with reference to Mother Theresa so he left you inspired.Catchy title, huh? This author's credo impressed Washington's Senator Dan Evans (he was in the audience when Mr. Fulghum, a minister, shared it in a primary school celebration) and eventually was read into the Congressional Record. The credo caught on and before long one would find it in 'Dear Abby', Reader's Digest, read by Paul Harvey and Larry King, and posters of it all over schools nationwide. This enthusiasm, I would venture to guess, launched this book. But he didn't go on about kindergarten stuff but instead wrote about collected favorite observations of his vision of the wonder of everyday life; uncommon thoughts on common things. Small observations with big meaning.Seriously a fun read!! Zany thoughts that make you go hmmm. Few of my favorites were: one about the raccoons, the story of Menon and the elderly Sikh, one he called "The Mystery of Twenty-Fifth Avenue, Northeast", Hong Duc's trick or treating at Christmas, and of course the one about Mother Theresa.I'm giving it a 5 for ease of read, fun content, creativity, and big meanings. Now here is the credo:Most of what I really need to know about how to live and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there is the sandpile at Sunday school. These are the things I learned:Share everything.Play fair.Don't hit people.Put things back where you found them.Clean up your own mess.Don't take things that aren't yours.Say you're sorry when you hurt somebody.Wash your hands before you eat.Flush.Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.Live a balanced life--learn some and think some and draw and paint and sing and dance and play and work every day some.Take a nap every afternoon.When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands and stick together.Be aware of wonder.**Find this review and more at Jinky is reading

  • Julie Rylie
    2019-03-16 21:39

    “These are the things I learned (in Kindergarten):1. Share everything.2. Play fair.3. Don't hit people.4. Put thngs back where you found them.5. CLEAN UP YOUR OWN MESS.6. Don't take things that aren't yours.7. Say you're SORRY when you HURT somebody.8. Wash your hands before you eat.9. Flush.10. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.11. Live a balanced life - learn some and drink some and draw some and paint some and sing and dance and play and work everyday some.12. Take a nap every afternoon.13. When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.14. Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the Stryrofoam cup: The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that.15. Goldfish and hamster and white mice and even the little seed in the Styrofoam cup - they all die. So do we.16. And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first word you learned - the biggest word of all - LOOK

  • Apple
    2019-02-24 05:07

    So, I don't understand why this is a New York Times best-seller? To each his own, then. But to me, this book felt like a venue for the author to explain away his own mulling. The title is "All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten";(a) and it sounds like an excuse to be a bit too childish and simplistic(b) but hardly any of the book is about things he really learned in Kindergarten.I don't know. I'm just really confused, annoyed, and disappointed.

  • Vishal Khatri
    2019-03-21 23:55

    "Anything worth doing is worth doing well. Anything not worth doing is worth not doing well."

  • K.D. Absolutely
    2019-02-23 00:58

    Funny and witty. I like the short anecdotes that support those learnings in kindergarten. I still remember one: "When crossing the street, hold each other hands" This is very true especially in the crazy streets of Manila.

  • Jaideep Khanduja
    2019-02-22 04:59

    http://pebbleinthestillwaters.blogspo...Book Review: All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten by Robert FulghumAll I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten - Robert FulghumSurprise 1: The book is listed at MSSurprise 2: There is only 1 review on such a marvelous book till dateBefore coming to the contents and other details of this book, let me create an atmosphere by phrasing some basic facts (and some queries), you are free to agree or disagree on each point:1. You will be blind towards the disabilities and weaknesses of your real friend.2. Every child grows surrounded by obsessions, compulsions, preservations and certain other behaviors around him/her.3. Genetics, environments and role models play a crucial part during the pre-birth and post birth growth of a child.4. There are lot of free things in life, don’t grab all, pick only what is needed, somebody else might need it urgently what is lying with you but not important at the moment. But prior to that it is very important to learn what I need in life.5. I remember more details about my friends and teachers upto secondary level than afterwards provided in both the case I have not met them for years.6. The most interesting lessons about life are taught by our parents and teachers without books.7. Just try to remember your role model in life and write few lines why you consider so.8. Who has been your best teacher? (it has to be one, not necessarily the one who formally taught you text books in school/college)9. Hugs are important part of life10. It is difficult to say “I am sorry”. It is easy to say “You are wrong”Book: “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten” is written by Robert Fulghum in 1986, it is 240 pages book having interesting compilation of life-lessons explained with short stories & illustrations. 15th anniversary print is available for Rs. 750/- (paperback) and around Rs. 1500/- (hardbound). ISBN 034546639X. I bought an older version at CP from a roadside bookseller (lucky I got it for Rs.250/-). The book has been translated to many international languages worldwide.An excerpt from the book: Robert Fulghum writes in “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten - “The inspiration for brevity came to me at a gasoline station. I managed to fill an old car’s tank with super deluxe high-octane go-juice. My old hoopy couldn’t handle it and got the willies--kept sputtering out at intersections and belching going downhill. I understood. My mine and my spirit get like that from time to time. Too much high-content information, and I get the existential willies--keep sputtering out at intersections where life choices must be made and I either know too much or not enough. The examined life is no picnic.”Lessons from the Book I learnt:1. Live a balanced life: Work and Play, Eat and Exercise, Speech and Silence, Pleasure and Prayer and so on… lot of things in life to be balanced.2. Wash your hands before you eat: no explanation required.3. Don’t take things that aren’t yours: very important. Know what you want, take what you need and keep till you need. This is one habit that would have avoided all wars happened so far and are about to come in the future. Be it world wars, Pandavs and auravs, Ram and Ravan, India Independence, etc. all arose just because someone wanted to pick somebody else’s things.4. Share everything: This is something we start doing on our own when we are very young, no hidings, no differentiations, and no hassles in sharing at that time till we grow up and learn what is not to be learnt.5. Put things back when you found them: love, hatred … run your own imaginations…6. Play fair: very important but equally difficult. Try, it returns lot of happiness.7. Clean up your own mess: As and when you are the part of a mess, clear it, else…8. Don’t hit people: hit the cause of pain, you can’t hit the pain directly. Similarly don’t hit the people, hit the problem. Philosophy of life is hitting on people will bounce back on you and hit you.9. Flush: Flush your anger, bad habits, wastes, ill feelings… keep flushing.10. Take a nap every afternoon: if not possible, take a break from your regular work, by sitting idle for a while – blank, meditate, relax, close eyes, and walk a little. Just give yourself a break.11. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you: enable cookies in your browser, which makes browsing faster. Jokes apart, just try fresh, warm cookies with cold milk.12. Learn some, think some, draw some, paint, sing, dance, play, and work everyday: don’t hesitate, you can do it, do it and see the difference.13. Say you’re sorry when you hurt someone: no need to explain, but only to realize it in time and say… else it becomes too late sometimes…14. Be aware of wonder: discover, encounter, face, welcome and be aware of wonder. Lot of things happen around, but goes unnoticed. Look around, wonder may be a perception taking a 360 degrees turn or anything else…15. When you go out in the world, watch for traffic, hold hands, and stick together: how lovely this statement is…16. Remember the little seed in the styrofoam cup: The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that – ponder, think, imagine and explain to yourself…17. Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and even the little seed in the Styrofoam cup - they all die. So do we – the crux of the matter, the reality of life, the completion of lifecycle…18. Remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first word you learned - the biggest word of all – LOOK - yep, look around, keep eyes and ears open, let sensory nerves not sublimed under the burdens of life, be light and absorbent every moment.19. And so on…and on… and on… read the book…bye bye!http://booksmakelife.blogspot.in/2011...

  • Leftbanker
    2019-03-12 00:52

    This is a veiled swipe at anyone who has bothered to actually continue learning since age five. It’s another brick in the wall of pop culture that makes people feel good about the fact that they are stupid motherfuckers who have never worked hard to develop their minds. What they are saying is, “It’s OK to be quasi-literate; everyone else is just like you.” Everyone except the adults sitting around the dinner table of life. I’ll admit that I’m sort of a dumb shit but it’s not from lack of trying. I’d rather read a book called Everything I know I learned During a 3 Week Opium Bender with a Lady-Boy in a Bangkok Brothel but what I’d really rather read is a book by an author who doesn’t have the prose style of Ned Flanders. He has a list of things he learned while he was peeing his pants every day in kindergarten. Some of them are so stupid that even Ned would probably take a swing at him for saying. #9 on his list is “Flush.” I would rather hang out with someone who has never flushed a day in her life than with anyone who found this book worth reading (I think I read bits of it years ago but I was looking at the reviews here today while researching something else). Yet another in a long list of books people latch on to with the hope of answering all of their questions about life, books like Eat, Pray Love, Five People The You Meet in Heaven, anything by Anthony Robbins, The Bible, The Koran, etc.

  • Malbadeen
    2019-03-03 22:05

    the lecture series that accompanies this book can be called: how I will display my self actualization to judge your lawn care habits.I don't remember much about this book except the over all sense that the author was pretty pleased with himself. I remember one part where he talked about his carefree acceptance of natures impression on his yard by explaining how silly his neighbor was to rake his leaves and mow the lawn. I didn't do a ton of gardening at the time (nor do I now) but I remember thinking there might be reasons he rakes his lawn, and now I'm older and I find the small amount of yard work I do to be very theraputic and enlightening in it's little revelations, things I wouldn't feel if I sat in my house with my typewriter watching my yard become slowely burried in whatever Mother Nature drops off. So I guess what I'm saying is screw mother nature, get out the clippers and let me trim that [email protected]#%& f$#$%$ hedge while I still can.And as a former kindergarten teacher I have to protest by saying there is still a lot of stuff to learn in 1st grade...like how to tie your own damn shoes!

  • Pandora
    2019-03-09 23:06

    I had to add this book after seeing it on the worst book list. Come on. It wasn't meant to be Les Mes or even a John Steinbeck. It was meant to be a happy book that helps you remember that it is and can be a good world out there. Which is needed after Neal Shusterman - a great author but, perhaps too good. See Unwind review - this book was used as an antidote.I did learn that sometimes it is the simple things that make life good. It is bettter to let go of our pride, judgements and just be in moment of living. Though it is tempeting to hide it is more important to be found. And he is right it is in kindergarten that we do learn the most important lessons of how to be a decent human being.Besides look at his picture. He just a teddy bear type of man who wants to share his joy of life with you. What in the world is so wrong with that???PS His later books do get better. Especially his wedding stories.

  • Louize
    2019-03-13 05:47

    I’ve been chewing on this book for a month. Trying to read and absorb it gradually; and never wanting it to end. Yes, I was hooked.Robert Fulghum wrote his journal-type stories in a very honest, child-like manner that it will capture you both in wonder and profound realization. It is amazing to know how our everyday life may be improved if we but apply things we already learned as a child. Life can be more meaningful, indeed, if we just stop worrying a lot and enjoy the simple things it offers. There are, of course, some things I do not agree with him (like his food preferences), but he sure did give more than a couple of pokes to think twice. I cannot count how many times I’ve laughed and grieved with this book; it was liberating in a way. I have named favorites, too, yet I know this is just the beginning of our fruitful relationship and I’ll be naming more favorites in the future.I highly recommend this book – short, simple and very RICH.

  • Paiman Chen
    2019-03-06 22:48

    All I really need to know I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate-school mountain.1. Share everything 2. Play fair 3. Don't hit people 4. Put things back where you found them 5. Clean up your own mess6. Don't take things that aren't yours 7. Say you're sorry when you hurt somebody 8. Wash your hands before you eat 9. Flush ....10.Warm cookies, cold milk are good for you 11.Live a balanced life- learn some, think some, draw,paint,sing,dance, play,work everyday some12. Take a nap every afternoon 13. When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands and stick together. 14. Wonder

  • Michael
    2019-03-13 01:48

    As suggested by the title, the lessons children can or should be getting in kindergarten make a great focus for adult living. Imagine how precepts like playing fair and not taking things that don't belong to you could resonate beyond childhood into sphere of politics and moral behavior. The rule of "cleaning up your own mess" or "putting things back where you found them" make a good foundation for clean ecological living. My favorite is "When you go out, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together".

  • Marianne Omalay
    2019-02-25 23:53

    I envy the author, Mr. Fulghum, because he met great people in his life which made great impact to his life too. This is not the type of book that I usually read but this bought entertainment to me. I love how he viewed his life and the life of people around him. I personally love how he connects the simple game ''hide and seek'' to the life of people today. His uncommon thoughts to common things made me want to have a friend like him. And most of all, he taught me that imagination is powerful. PS. I want to memorize his wonderful list of things he learned (in Kindergarten): 1. Share everything.2. Play fair.3. Don't hit people.4. Put thngs back where you found them.5. CLEAN UP YOUR OWN MESS.6. Don't take things that aren't yours.7. Say you're SORRY when you HURT somebody.8. Wash your hands before you eat.9. Flush.10. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.11. Live a balanced life - learn some and drink some and draw some and paint some and sing and dance and play and work everyday some.12. Take a nap every afternoon.13. When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.14. Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the Stryrofoam cup: The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that.15. Goldfish and hamster and white mice and even the little seed in the Styrofoam cup - they all die. So do we.16. And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first workd you learned - the biggest word of all - LOOK.

  • Nur Banu Simsek
    2019-02-24 02:03

    Easy read, has a raw quality to it that is refreshing but also uncomfortably at peace with itself sometimes – perhaps because it was written 20+ years ago. In the end, cute life lessons, and reminders.

  • Erdenetuya Bat-erdene
    2019-02-25 22:52

    3.5/5

  • Sasha
    2019-02-19 02:50

    This novel was the first my boyfriend ever gave to me. We had been dating for 2 weeks when his family invited me down to celebrate Christmas with them. As a Jew, I had not celebrated Christmas before, and I was nervous about that cultural difference, as well as what to get everyone, these strangers I had not yet met, and what they would think of me, this vegetarian, anemic, sailor-mouthed girl so unlike their son whose main aspiration in life was to teach kindergarten (whereas he was studying to be an engineer at the time, and thus, I suppose, his future was considered more secure and profitable). I felt incredibly self-conscious that week. I wore my best clothing. I blushed with shame when I realized his mother cooked a different casserole for me because I couldn't eat the sausage in it. I went to church with them and listened to an entire congregation sing songs I did not know, and light handheld candles in the silent night. I had bought gag gifts, much like my family does for Hannukah, because I genuinely believed that was what one did for Christmas, too. Imagine my mortification when my boyfriend places two beautiful dendrobium orchids in my hands, a book, a card, and a shoebox full of mementos and pictures, and all I had for him was a mixtape of cheesy 80s songs and a Viking hat I had purchased from a toy store? (To be fair, he had long blonde hair and a beard at the time, and was constantly being mistaken for Jesus and Thor, so I thought the gift was at least apt). I remember holding my breath, touched by the kindness and hospitality of his family and by my own misunderstanding. I couldn't wait to slink back into my bedroom in despair. As soon as it was socially permissible, I made some sort of excuse and hightailed it out of there. I opened the book, which I had been too embarrassed to read in front of everyone, and read the inscription he had mentioned. On the front page, he thanked me for being brave enough to meet his family on short notice, and then he put the words I will never forget. "I know you will be an amazing teacher." It does sound terribly Hallmark channel, I know, but at the time, I was a young college student and it seemed everyone, friends, professors, even members of my own family were utterly against it and called it a "waste" of my potential. He signed it with love, and that, also, was earth-shaking - the first time a boy loved me back. I remember holding the book pressed to my heart, and then flipping past the first page to the meat of it. I read the book Christmas night, unable to sleep. I understood the shoebox he gave me was his version of a Gummy Lump, as described in the book. There are lovely tidbits, too, such as how teachers are like time-capsules with the way they come up with crafts, themed bulletin boards, and activities for each holiday. When I got my first teaching job after graduation, I read the book again for courage and inspiration. There have been other Christmases, and other Gummy Lumps, and other Fulghum's on our shelf (I believe my boyfriend is currently reading "Uh-Oh"), but this remains the most beloved. It is the book that made me realize that some people - perfectly respectable, successful people - believed in and appreciated teachers. It is the book that helped me believe in myself.

  • gauldy
    2019-02-26 04:54

    Já vlastně nevím, co o téhle knížce psát. Tak jsem si říkal, že nenapíšu nic. Ale to by zase bylo škoda, nic nepsat. Takže přeci to zkusím."VŠECHNO, CO OPRAVDU POTŘEBUJI ZNÁT o tom, jak žít, co dělat a jak vůbec být, jsem se naučil v mateřské školce. Moudrost mě nečekala na vrcholu hory zvané postgraduál, ale na pískovišti v nedělní škole. Tohle jsem se naučil:O všechno se rozděl. Hraj fér. Nikoho nebij. Vracej věci tam, kde jsi je našel. Uklízej po sobě. Neber si nic, co ti nepatří. Když někomu ublížíš, řekni promiň. Před jídlem si umyj ruce. Splachuj. Teplé koláčky a studené mléko ti udělají dobře. Žij vyrovnaně - trochu se uč a trochu přemýšlej a každý den trochu maluj a kresli a zpívej a tancuj a hraj si a pracuj. Každý den odpoledne si zdřímni. Když vyrazíš do světa, dávej pozor na auta, chytni někoho za ruku a drž se s ostatními pohromadě. Nepřestávej žasnout. Vzpomeň si na semínko v plastikovém kelímku - kořínky míří dolů a rostlinka stoupá vzhůru a nikdo vlastně neví jak a proč, ale my všichni jsme takoví. Zlaté rybičky, křečci a bílé myšky a dokonce i to semínko v kelímku - všichni umřou. My také. A nikdy nezapomeň na dětské obrázkové knížky a první slovo, které ses naučil - největší slovo ze všech - DÍVEJ SE."Jak Fulghum sám na úvodu říká, je filosofem všedního dne. Témata, o kterých mluví, nenaznačují, že by měla být kdovíjak velkolepá. A přeci ty myšlenky, které na nich staví, docela velké jsou. I přesto, že se mluví stále o docela obyčejných věcech, je to, co Fulghum píše, svým zvláštním způsobem docela velkolepé.Na rovinu musím říct, že nejsme s autorem úplně na stejné vlně, neumím sdílet jeho pohled v úplně všech věcech, o kterých mluví, některé mi přijdou vážně vyloženě snílkovské a takovým já nedokážu moc věřit, poněvadž jsem na ně moc realista, suchar nebo cokoli dalšího. Nicméně zároveň si teď tak říkám - jo, tuhle knížku bych chtěl mít doma na celý život a občas, když bude dlouhá chvíle v zimě, si pár těch mouder přečíst, protože je to neskutečně příjemné nějakým způsobem vypnout, nic moc nedělat a chvíli přemýšlet jako Fulghum. Koneckonců, ze stejného důvodu mám doma Plíhalovy rýmovačky. Nebudu to dále rozvádět, ale teď mě napadlo, že Bukowski a Fulghum vlastně píšou o tomtéž. Jen každý úplně jinak. A to je dobře.Takže ačkoli tahle Fulghumova knížka není žádná Citadela, tak říkám - jo, proč ne.

  • Samantha
    2019-03-16 03:56

    A few days ago, I ran across this book on my bookshelf. It had been sitting on one shelf or another, moving with me from place to place for about a decade. So I finally cracked it open. Two days later I'm wondering what exactly it was I read. It's a collection of stories, written almost like journal entries. Some that uncover wisdom, some that I didn't really get any deeper meaning from. The best part of the book, and my favorite quote from it, is within the first few pages:Share everything.Play fair.Don't hit people.Put things back where you found them.Clean up your own mess.Don't take things that aren't yours.Say you're sorry when you hurt somebody.Wash your hands before you eat.Flush.Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.Live a balanced life - learn some and think someand draw and paint and sing and dance and playand work every day some.Take a nap every afternoon.When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic,hold hands, and stick together.Be aware of wonder.Remember the little seed in the styrofoam cup:The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobodyreally knows how or why, but we are all like that.Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and eventhe little seed in the Styrofoam cup - they all die.So do we.And then remember the Dick-and-Jane booksand the first word you learned - the biggestword of all - LOOK…I think through most of the stories Fulghum was trying to convey those things: that you shouldn't take things too personally, that you should look for the good in situations and that you should be happy with the simple. And honestly, that's not a terrible lesson.

  • Jules Alder
    2019-03-18 05:51

    If you've never read Robert Fulghum before (It Was on Fire When I Lay Down on It), this is a good place to start. This wee book made a substantial impact on me partly for personal reasons, but mainly because modern philosophers are too few and not always focused on what matters in the grand microcosm--being kind to others and kind to ourselves. In an age when it seems like everyone and their mother is diagnosed as suffering from some sort of depression, I can't help but think that we lost something when we decided we didn't need philosophers, just like standing up to the establishment lost something when poets no longer mattered. My maternal grandfather used to read me Kierkegaard to put me to sleep as a baby. While I was in my teens, he sent us this--a volume to open our eyes instead. Poppa loved Fulghum so much, he would even go see him perform when the writer/philosopher was in Maine. I never got to see him, and I can tell that my life lacks a little something for it. I've little doubt that, in addition to needing a nap every afternoon, you are going to want a philosopher (and a poet) around at least once in a lifetime. This sits in a place of high honor on my work-in-progress list--Book #12 of the "100 Books You Should Read Before You Die" (#100BooksFTW if you are on Twitter).

  • Yva Ladera
    2019-03-08 21:48

    I have to say this book has not taught me a lot but rather it has opened my eyes to things I had somewhat already noticed. But I MUST thank Queenelle for recommending this book. It was a fun yet thoughtful read. While reading, i have come to realize that my ideas about simplicity being the best form of happiness are headed in the right direction. I rather enjoyed how the author showed his wit and simplicity through his credo. He spoke of, "Warm cookies and cold milk" and how we should, "go out into the world, watch for traffic, hold hands, and stick together." Words like that for some reason just bring a smile to my face. I also enjoyed how honest the author was. He invited you to look in on his life. I also came to the realization that the author uses anecdotes, whether they are his or others, to help explain a simple life lesson. He would start out talking about a normal day at the zoo then somehow incorporate the meaningful question of "What's it for?" Honestly, i was sad to see the last page turn. I would love to read more work from this author but I would also highly recommend this book to anyone willing to dig a little bit deeper.

  • Cecil
    2019-03-07 00:55

    As a person who never went to kindergarten--look, it was a small rural community and my parents needed help in the grist mill--I decided that buying this book was not an option for me. The logical corollary of the title is that, lacking a kindergarten education, my BSBA, MBA and JD combined could not save me. Clearly, I knew nothing of what I REALLY needed to know. From the book, I learned that I should be nice to the other children, share my stuff, be quiet sometimes, and always take a nap. Sage advice for kindergarteners and for some of us children who have passed the big One-O a few years back. The author--a man of the cloth--apparently wrote the book after counseling many adults who felt that their lives were overwhelmingly complicated because they had forgotten these simple lessons. Overall, the book is one of those warm and fuzzy books that helps readers look at their overwhelmingly complicated lives in simpler terms that make them less overwhelming.

  • Amanda Hankins
    2019-03-06 05:09

    Robery Fulghum’s iconic bestseller about the simple acts of everyday childhood and beyond were turned into this memorable little gem. It has become one of my favorite books, not because it is the literary genius of a lifetime, but because his simple idea could become such a simple book that had the potential to touch so many people. I read it for the laugh, the moment where he ties the memory of a Styrofoam cup plant to the cycle of life is simple brilliance. Although it is not the self help book of the century, it is hard to not get carried away in his witty comparisons. Something as little as continuing to be amazed at the world around you even in old age is a philosophy you will find in his work. A child’s eyes are brilliant, to even have the chance to see through them for a minute is wonderful.

  • sarafem
    2019-03-05 04:51

    This is more of a 3 1/2 stars book; I have never wanted to read this book, but I bought it at a yard sale for a nickel and this morning I wanted something light that I could read while sitting in the doctor's office for. ever. I got the whole thing read, and frankly, it was a good book. Not at all the drivel I expected, based on the uproar made about this book by absolutely vapid people.I'm a big fan of "the little things" and silver linings. That is what this book is about - finding life lessons and simple joy in everyday occurences. He manages to shape mundane events into extraordinary tales, and that is the sort of thing that I really enjoy. It doesn't take a great imagination or experience to write something worthwhile; all it takes is a unique perspective.

  • Greg
    2019-03-21 03:05

    All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten was Fulghum's first collection of essays. I liked his style then, and still do. His writing reminds me of Mayberry...it evokes a sort of down-home feeling that brings to mind warm apple pie cooling on an open window sill, children playing on lazy summer afternoons, and neighborly conversations over backyard fences. Fulghum does a nice job of exploring simple things from a profound and thoughtful perspective to gently guide the reader to wisdom. His writing style is simple and direct. I found myself reading with a pencil in hand, underlying passages and phrases I wanted to remember, and writing notes about my thoughts on his thoughts in the margins. It was a delightful read!