Read Thinking in Jazz: The Infinite Art of Improvisation by Paul F. Berliner Online

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A landmark in jazz studies, Thinking in Jazz reveals as never before how musicians, both individually and collectively, learn to improvise. Chronicling leading musicians from their first encounters with jazz to the development of a unique improvisatory voice, Paul Berliner documents the lifetime of preparation that lies behind the skilled improviser's every idea.The producA landmark in jazz studies, Thinking in Jazz reveals as never before how musicians, both individually and collectively, learn to improvise. Chronicling leading musicians from their first encounters with jazz to the development of a unique improvisatory voice, Paul Berliner documents the lifetime of preparation that lies behind the skilled improviser's every idea.The product of more than fifteen years of immersion in the jazz world, Thinking in Jazz combines participant observation with detailed musicological analysis, the author's experience as a jazz trumpeter, interpretations of published material by scholars and performers, and, above all, original data from interviews with more than fifty professional musicians: bassists George Duvivier and Rufus Reid; drummers Max Roach, Ronald Shannon Jackson, and Akira Tana; guitarist Emily Remler; pianists Tommy Flanagan and Barry Harris; saxophonists Lou Donaldson, Lee Konitz, and James Moody; trombonist Curtis Fuller; trumpeters Doc Cheatham, Art Farmer, Wynton Marsalis, and Red Rodney; vocalists Carmen Lundy and Vea Williams; and others. Together, the interviews provide insight into the production of jazz by great artists like Betty Carter, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Coleman Hawkins, and Charlie Parker.Thinking in Jazz overflows with musical examples from the 1920s to the present, including original transcriptions (keyed to commercial recordings) of collective improvisations by Miles Davis's and John Coltrane's groups. These transcriptions provide additional insight into the structure and creativity of jazz improvisation and represent a remarkable resource for jazz musicians as well as students and educators.Berliner explores the alternative ways—aural, visual, kinetic, verbal, emotional, theoretical, associative—in which these performers conceptualize their music and describes the delicate interplay of soloist and ensemble in collective improvisation. Berliner's skillful integration of data concerning musical development, the rigorous practice and thought artists devote to jazz outside of performance, and the complexities of composing in the moment leads to a new understanding of jazz improvisation as a language, an aesthetic, and a tradition. This unprecedented journey to the heart of the jazz tradition will fascinate and enlighten musicians, musicologists, and jazz fans alike....

Title : Thinking in Jazz: The Infinite Art of Improvisation
Author :
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ISBN : 9780226043814
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 904 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Thinking in Jazz: The Infinite Art of Improvisation Reviews

  • John
    2018-11-29 17:03

    Of all the books I own, I probably recommend this one to the most people! I love jazz and, as far as I'm concerned, this is the single best volume on the theory and practice of jazz I've ever read! It does get pretty technical at times, so it might not be good for people who don't know much musical theory.For those who do know theory, it's a wealth of information! And it comes with transcriptions of many famous jazz solos so you can try and learn them yourself, to feel what it's like to play them, and to experience the vast gulf between the written note and the soul of the music.

  • Raz O'Xane
    2018-11-27 15:10

    Very interesting read, but too technical at times. I skipped part V as I don't play anymore and never could read partitions anyway. Skipped anything beyond as well as my reader wouldn't let me go through notes easily.A dense read, will have to read it again sometime in the future.

  • Lawrence
    2018-11-22 21:09

    Not for the musically uninitiated (or those like me, who can't read music), the book nevertheless is an interesting study of how jazz musicians develop over the course of their careers. A process of life-long learning, the development must of necessity involve musical knowledge, technical ability, generational communication, and cultural involvement. This book simply counters any naive notion of what jazz improvisation is. Not the free flowing, spur of the moment creation, it's a product of the continuing learning process that it jazz itself. I may not be able to read a musical score, but that didn't stop me from understanding the point of this study or appreciating its point about what make jazz improvisation so special. And, knowing that improvisation isn't just spontaneousness personified, doesn't make it any less spectacular when you hear and see it in a great jazz performance.

  • Adrian Stevenson
    2018-12-09 16:02

    I've just started re-reading an ebook version of this, as I like to have some jazz reading on my ereader, and this is a great one to dip in to. I don't think I quite finished it last time around either. It's probably fair to say it is a little dry in it's style, but nevertheless it's very thorough, and is considered to be the best book on the subject. The paper. version is a hefty weight, so it's perfect for the ebook medium

  • Jmswtsn
    2018-11-18 17:44

    I usually don't put text books on my favs, but this one is good, if long. Extremely well researched and well written. Also includes interview smippets with a former colleague (Akira Tana), so thats something.

  • Mayakronfeld
    2018-11-27 14:47

    A precious resource. Incredibly thorough and well-researched. Makes important theoretical claims and then fills in the little nuts and bolts of real musical life with wonderful detail. Perfect for the disinterested observer who would like to get into the mind of the performer AND vise versa.

  • Matthew Somoroff
    2018-12-07 16:47

    A huge, reference-like work. I'm in a continual state of reading, referencing, browsing.

  • Morris Nelms
    2018-11-18 19:13

    The best book on jazz music and how to play it I've yet read. Lots of information. lf you play you should read it.